Northeast Delta Dental Mount Washington Road Race raises more than $15k for Coos County Family Health Services

PINKHAM NOTCH, NH— More than $15,000 was raised and recently donated to Coos County Family Health Services (CCFHS) as a result of the 2013 Northeast Delta Dental Mount Washington Road Race, which took place in June on the Mt Washington Auto Road. More than 1,300 dedicated runners came together to face the immense challenge of running up the northeast’s highest peak on one of the toughest eight mile courses in the racing world. While it was a day marked by genuine athletic achievement, thanks to Northeast Delta Dental and the Auto Road, the benefits will be felt long into the future in the local community.

Pictured in photo: Events Director of the Mt. Washington Auto Road Kimberly Hoyt, Manager of Community Relations at Northeast Delta Dental, Crystal Carroll and General Manager of the Mt Washington Auto Road Howie Wemyss present a check for $15,000 to Chief Executive Officer, Adele Woods; President of the Board of Directors, Robert Pelchat; and Loretta Morrissette, RDH, all of Coos County Family Health Services. These funds were raised during the 53rd running of the Northeast Delta Dental Mount Washington Road Race.

“These funds mean the world to our organization and will really help expand the scope of dental services to our patients and community. It is rare to receive funds to cover dental care for adults, so this will make a huge difference,” noted Adele Woods, CEO of CCFHS.

Coos County Family Health Services serves approximately 15,000 area residents annually. By addressing dental care needs in the clinic rather than in a hospital emergency room it helps defray enormous expenses for patients. This community-based organization provides personalized, comprehensive general and oral healthcare and social services to everyone, regardless of economic status.

Northeast Delta Dental has been the primary sponsor of the Mount Washington Road Race since 2001. Since 1995, the Northeast Delta Dental Foundation has donated nearly $50,000 to support the CCFHS school-based oral health education program, fluoride rinse, and preventive dental services. The center’s status as the new beneficiary of the race is a reminder of the Auto Road’s and Northeast Delta Dental’s extensive ties to the region, and to the race’s commitment to the well-being of the larger community.

“This is a wonderful event for the participants and the organization it supports. Our sponsorship of this race and support of Coos County Family Health Services is all a part of Northeast Delta Dental’s commitment to oral health and well being of North Country residents. Like the Mt Washington Auto Road, we pride ourselves in being a part of this community and look forward to our collaborative and beneficial efforts in the future,” said Kathleen B. Walker, director of marketing & communications at Northeast Delta Dental.

For more information and complete results of the Northeast Delta Dental Mount Washington Road Race visit www.mountwashingtonroadrace.com. For more information about the Coos County Family Health Services organization visit www.coosfamilyhealth.org.

 

 

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Muster in the Mountains

“Muster in the Mountains” Colonial Encampment Returns to Mt. Washington Auto Road Base Area-Public Invited to See and Experience Time Travel Sept. 6-8th

PINKHAM NOTCH, NH – The Autumn “Muster in the Mountains” which takes place annually at the Mt. Washington Auto Road portrays one of New Hampshire’s most dramatic and colorful time periods (1750-1850). The sights, sounds and smell of time travel, including open cook fires and musket and cannon fire, will come to life on September 6-8, as more than 100 historical reenactors set up their camps at the base area of the Mt. Washington Auto Road on Route 16 in Pinkham Notch.

This colonial encampment will recreate the historic gatherings where early settlers traded goods and services, often traveling great distances for the annual rendezvous. Groups representing Northeastern Indians, frontiersmen, militiamen, British soldiers, French Marines and mountain men will set up period tentage, tipis and wigwams.

Artisans will offer handcrafted items ranging from leather goods and clothing to period beadwork, knives, guns and rare books. Planned activities include musket and cannon firing; tomahawk and knife throwing competitions; weaving; woodcarving; gunsmithing; coppersmithing; blacksmithing; period music; candle dipping; basketmaking; quillwork; period cooking; woodcraft; archery; 18th century games and more!

muster 2011 031 Saturday will be competition day, with cannon fire, a shooting range and woods walk/mock hunt. The encampment area will be open to the public (free of charge) each day from 9 am to 6 pm. The Auto Road will be open for normal operations.

“This Muster in the Mountains is the closest thing to time travel you can find—it’s an amazing sight and a great reminder of the lifestyles and challenges faced by those who carved out a life here centuries before us. Talking with these very knowledgeable reenactors and seeing a colonial era world come to life with the Presidential Range as a backdrop is a rare opportunity!” observed Steve Caming, Media Director of the Mt. Washington Auto Road and Great Glen Trails Outdoor Center.

muster 2011 125For more information on the upcoming Muster in the Mountains call the Mt. Washington Auto Road at 603-466-3988 or online at: www.mtwashingtonautoroad.com

Pictured in Photos: Historical reenactors participating in a previous Muster in the Mountains at the base of the Mt. Washington Auto Road on Route 16 in Pinkham Notch.
(Steven Caming/Mt. Washington Auto Road Photos)

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Mt. Washington Alt Summit Weekend Builds Energy

“Mt. Washington Auto Road Alt Energy Summit” on September 14-15, 2013 Builds Momentum With Full Slate of Both Mainstream and Newly Developed Alternative Energy Based Vehicles and Technologies On Hand For Demonstrations and Drive Up Northeast’s Highest Peak

PINKHAM NOTCH, NH— What began as a spark is now fully charged up as the “Mt. Washington Auto Road Alt Energy Summit” on September 14-15, 2013 has generated a great deal of support within the ever broadening alternative energy sector. Major manufacturers, electric vehicle associations, industry suppliers and individual “makers” and inventors will all be on hand, as the Auto Road continues as a proving and playground for new and evolving technologies.

Among those manufacturers, builders and organizations planning to attend are: Lovering Mitsubishi with the MiEV; Banks Chevrolet with the new VOLT, Corbin Sparrow (represented by famed inventor Mike Corbin); Zoombikes, Zero Bikes, the Dirigo Vehicle (a diesel which gets up to 99 mpg), the ELF electric bike; Tesla Motors; Torke Electric Vehicles and the MIT team with their Porsche and ebike. Organizations in attendance will include: Solarfest (the renewable energy festival that takes place in Vermont each year) and this summit will serve as the launch for the newly formed Boston Chapter of the Electric Automobile Association.

Also planning to attend is Prof. Charles MacArthur, who rode the first Corbin Electric motorcycle to the summit of the Northeast’s highest peak in 1974, as part of the original “Mt. Washington Alternative Energy Regatta”, which he helped organize. In those early days of Alt Energy, 17 converted cars and bikes showed up, including a steam powered trike and a sewage powered methane bus.

Categories will include EV manufacturers, dealers, retailers, groups and associations, makers, inventors, developers, publications and related media, components/parts and services. Individuals and organizations with vehicles including cars, trucks motorcycles and bicycles or unique one-of-a-kind creations are also invited. An Energy Expo Exhibit area is planned, which will include vehicle manufacturers, related alternative energy businesses and historic vehicles which have ascended Mt. Washington by other than gas powered engines. Exhibits and information regarding other sustainable energy sources will also be featured, including hydro-electric, wind power, solar power and geo-thermal.

“This event has been met with great enthusiasm at all levels of the Alt energy world,” Noted Event Director Ted Dillard. “This event will recognize how far the industry has come, from individual inventors and makers to mass produced electric vehicles by the world’s major carmakers. As I’ve said before, this will be a landmark event in New Hampshire!” he added.

What to Expect:

• Vendors, Dealers, and Manufacturers of Hybrid, Plug-In Hybrid, Plug-In Electric and Alternative Fuel vehicles showing some of the most remarkable vehicles available today – complete with test rides.

• Information “roundtable” discussion sessions for homeowners, backyard inventors, public administrators, fleet managers and others on Renewable Energy solutions available today, and funding opportunities and resources.

• Supplies, components, parts and systems for Renewable Energy systems for homes, businesses and vehicles.

• Exhibits of unique, creative and innovative solutions for energy and transportation systems offered by inventors, students, “makers”, researchers and enthusiasts.

• The Alt Energy Drive to the Summit – watch and cheer on our “Alt Energy contestants” as they make history on Mt. Washington. Everything from home-built electric bikes, cars and motorcycles to the sleekest high-performance plug-in vehicles on the road today will be on hand. Watch for some truly unusual solutions there as well, including some top-secret “unmanned transportation” research projects currently in development. Awards and categories for the Summit will reward ingenuity, creativity and dedication.

Also on hand and in operation will be the first Alt energy vehicle to ever ascend the Mt. Washington Auto Road—the original, steam powered Stanley Locomobile that made the trip from Newton, Massachusetts to the summit of the mountain in 1899.

The Auto Road is also pleased to announce the recent installation of its first charging station, which can accommodate electric vehicles seeking a “charge for no charge” when in Pinkham Notch.

For more information about or to register for the “Mt. Washington Auto Road Alt Energy Summit” event at the Mt. Washington Auto Road call Event Director Ted Dillard (978) 621-5178 or online at www.mtwashingtonautoroad.com

 

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Cogburn and Wunderwald pedal fastest to the top

Pinkham Notch, N.H-  An M.I.T. graduate student in astrophysics and a research chemist showed today that scientific careers have not hampered their bicycling abilities. Cameron Cogburn, 27, of Cambridge, Mass., and Silke Wunderwald, 42, of Hopkinton, R.I., took the top prizes today in the 41st annual Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb, a 7.6-mile all-uphill race to the summit of the highest peak in the northeastern United States.

Cogburn, a former professional rider who returned to amateur status to concentrate on his studies, blasted off the starting line at the base of the Mt. Washington Auto Road and led a pack of six riders for the first two miles before pulling away and pedaling solo to a finishing time of 50 minutes 48 seconds. That time was nearly two minutes faster than last year, when he first won this race, and within sight of the course record 49:24, set in 2002 by Tour de France racer Tom Danielson.

“I know I could get the record,” said Cogburn after reaching the 6288-foot summit of Mt. Washington. “It’s a matter of losing a couple of pounds. But last week I went to Leadville” – a 100-mile bike race at high altitude in Colorado, where Cogburn finished fourth – “and I suffered a bit at 12,000 feet! I’m happy with today.”

Cameron Cogburn, of Cambridge, MA, rides through the finishing Photo Dennis Coughlin

Cogburn’s closest pursuer was 23-year-old Erik Levinsohn, a first-year Yale medical student with extensive bike-racing success in New England. “My plan was to stay with Cameron as long as possible,” said Levinsohn. “But that was for only two and a half miles! The finish was a long way coming after that.” Levinsohn finished in 53:29. Third place went to Jeremiah Bishop, 37, of Harrisonburg, Virginia, in 54:24.

One of the country’s most accomplished mountain bike racers, Bishop was testing himself on the Auto Road’s 12 percent grade for the first time. “This is a spectacular place to ride,” he said at the windswept summit, as he and Cogburn wrapped themselves in blankets against the 30-mph winds, and compared notes. “For a hillclimb, I don’t know anything quite like it.” Bishop added that he and Cogburn would meet again the next day in the Hampshire 100, a 100-mile off-road race near Greenfield, N.H. “I feel like this’ll warm me up for tomorrow.”

Wunderwald pumped her fist as she sailed through the finish in one hour 9 minutes 56 seconds, a welcome improvement on her Mt. Washington debut last year, when she finished third in 1:10:47.

“The lesson I learned last year,” she said, “was, Don’t go out too hard!” Like many Mt. Washington racers before her, she discovered that the only way to ride well on the Auto Road is to concentrate on pacing, not on the competition. Silke Wunderwald, of of Hopkington, RI, won the women's division of the 41st annual Mount Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb, in Pinkham Notch, NH, on August 17th, 2013, with a time of 1:09:56. Over 500 competitors finished the 7.6 mile Auto Road course, to the 6,288' summit of Mount Washington, tallest peak in the northeastern United States.                                                         Photo Dennis Coughlin

As her fellow winner Cogburn put it, “You have to stay within your limits and not think about the other riders.”

A native of the Lake Constanz region of Germany, Wunderwald moved to the U.S. twenty years ago and works in research and development with Pfizer in Groton, Ct. She began competitive cycling in 2006 and in the last two years has focused on hillclimbs. The women’s runnerup was 28-year-old Stefanie Sydlik of Cambridge, Mass., in 1:12:59. Third was Line Lauritsen, 31, of McHenry, Maryland, in 1:14:33.

In a field of 504 finishers, the first New Hampshire riders to reach the top of Mt. Washington were Douglas Jansen, 50, of Pelham, placing 18th overall in 1:05:12 and Christine Jankins, 49, of Hampton, 237th overall in 1:30:56.

For their victories, Cogburn and Wunderwald won $1500 apiece. All proceeds from the race benefit the Tin Mountain Conservation Center in Albany, N.H., which offers classes, workshops, camps, excursions and other lessons in natural history and the environment.

TOP MEN
1. Cameron Cogburn, 27, Cambridge MA 50:48
2. Erik Levinsohn, 23, Williamstown MA 53:29
3. Jeremiah Bishop, 37, Harrisonburg VA 54:24
4. Ryan Miller, 22, Corvallis OR 55:23
5. Chris Carr, 30, Golden CO 56:52
6. Timothy Ahearn, 39, Woodstock CT 56:55
7. Sean McCarthy, 29, Amherst MA 58:38
8. William Cooper, 25, Philadelphia PA 59:35
9. Chris Yura, 34, Bryn Mawr PA 59:54
10. Nate Whitman, 38, Los Angeles CA 1:00:12

TOP WOMEN
1. Silke Wunderwald, 42, Hopkinton RI 1:09:56
2. Stefanie Sydlik, 28, Cambridge MA 1:12:59
3. Line Lauritsen, 31, McHenry MD 1:14:33
4. Kristen Gohr, 43, Reading MA 1:15:06
5. Patricia Karter, 57, Milton MA 1:20:57
6. Elizabeth Bove, 42, Woodstock CT 1:21:53
7. Kelley Fitzgerald, 47, Woburn MA 1:24:28
8. Michelle Vuolo, 41, Stow MA 1:25:09
9. Susan Lucek, 53, Tolland CT 1:25:20
10. Margaret Thompson, 59, Clinton NY 1:25:32

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For further information:John Stifler, press liaison — jstifler@econs.umass.edu Before 6 p.m. Saturday Aug. 17: 603-466-3988 After that: 413-320-7510

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Young riders in the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb

Pinkham Notch, N.H.-For four decades the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb has attracted Olympic competitors, highly ranked amateurs of road and mountain bike racing, aspiring young professional cyclists aiming to demonstrate their climbing prowess, and extreme athletes of many stripes who are looking for a new challenge. They battle the Auto Road’s relentless 12 percent grade and Mt. Washington’s high winds in order to climb 4707 feet to the mountain’s summit, at 6288 feet the highest peak in the northeastern U.S.

The Hillclimb also attracts riders who just look like, well, children.

Don’t be fooled. They ride hard, they’re experienced, and they are fun to watch.

One young rider at Mt. Washington has become a familiar face at major competitions from coast to coast. He is 14-year-old Jonah Thompson of Albuquerque, N.M., who first raced in the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb at the age of nine – four years younger than the next-youngest person in the race – and placed 442nd out of nearly 600 finishers. Last year he finished in one hour 22 minutes 39 seconds, placing 149th overall and fifth in the Junior age group, which was otherwise filled with 17- and 18-year olds.

Earlier this summer, Thompson competed in Newton’s Revenge, the other race held each summer on this same all-uphill course, and finished 23rd overall among nearly 200 riders, in a time of 1:15:25. Now nationally known as a highly talented and competitive road and off-road bicycle racer, Thompson placed fourth among in the Junior division last month in the Pike’s Peak Cycling Hillclimb in Colorado. (The Pike’s Peak race represents an altitude gain similar to that at Mt. Washington, but extended over 12 miles and with some downward dips in the course. Pike’s Peak is at a higher altitude, but Mt. Washington is considerably steeper.)

The youngest rider entered in this year’s Hillclimb is 11-year-old Maria Goodwin of Chocorua, N.H. Goodwin, a sixth grader at Kenneth A. Brett School in Tamworth, N.H., enjoys gymnastics and bike riding. Part of her inspiration for cycling comes from her father, Ron Goodwin, who has ridden the Hillclimb half a dozen times.

Maria got her first uphill racing experience this spring in Crank The Kanc, a 21-mile race up the Kancamagus Highway, just south of Mt. Washington. That race climbs 2300 feet – modest by Mt. Washington standards, but respectable nonetheless — and it attracts many of the same cyclists who compete in the Hillclimb. Maria rode it with her father, himself a past winner of the event, and finished in two hours 13 minutes.

While other riders pay a $350 entry fee to compete in the Hillclimb, Maria Goodwin is enjoying the opportunity to compete for free, courtesy of the Residence Inn Marriot of North Conway, the MWV Bicycling Club and the Tin Mountain Conservation Center, which is the primary beneficiary of the race. Each year these three organizations offer a free entry to a local youth, selected from among all junior riders (21 years and under) who apply. Maria is the youngest rider ever to receive this free entry – and its first female recipient.

The regular entry fee is a donation to the Tin Mountain Conservation Center, which offers classes, workshops, excursions and other lessons in the workings of the natural world. Further information about educational programs, camps and other activities at Tin Mountain is available at www.tinmountain.org.

On Friday, August 16, the day before the race, Maria Goodwin and Jonah Thompson will join the race’s “Meet & Greet” session from 5-6 p.m., talking with any of the other 635 riders who’ll be making the climb the next day. At tables under the big tent at the Auto Road base, they’ll join older cycling notables including defending Hillclimb champion Cameron Cogburn, 2008 national mountain bike champion Jeremiah Bishop, top amateur cyclist Tim Ahearn, and veteran racer Margaret Thompson.

The race starts Saturday in five waves, beginning at 8:35 a.m. with the Top Notch (elite) group and continuing at five-minute intervals with four successive waves of riders sorted by age. If severe weather conditions make the Auto Road unsafe for riding, the race will be postponed to Sunday, August 18, with the same starting time.

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2 Days until the 41st Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb

Pinkham Notch, N.H.This Saturday’s Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb promises to be one of the best two-rider battles in memory. It pits defending champion and former road-racing pro Cameron Cogburn, 27, against mountain and cross-country biking star Jeremiah Bishop, 37, who will be racing up the Mt. Washington Auto Road for the first time.

Three-time defending champion Marti Shea, of Marblehead, Massachusetts, would have been the prohibitive favorite on the women’s side, but Shea recently confirmed that other obligations will keep her from competing. The women’s top prize is thus open to a number of strong riders, of whom the favorite may be Kristen Gohr, 42, of Reading, Massachusetts.

TWO EXTREME RACES IN TWO DAY
Cogburn, of Cambridge, Mass., and Bishop, of Harrisonburg, Virginia, will meet twice this weekend, in what Bishop recently referred to as New England “diabolical double” – the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb on Saturday and the Hampshire 100-mile mountain endurance race on Sunday.

On Saturday they’ll contend not only with each other but with the 12 percent grade of the Auto Road, which rises without a break for 7.6 miles to the 6288-foot summit of New Hampshire’s Mt. Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States. Besides the ultra-steep grade, the course poses the additional challenges of frequently very high winds and an ascent through several different climate zones. On Sunday in Greenfield, N.H., they’ll race 100 miles over varied terrain, much of it rocky, in a course some riders consider to be as difficult as the famed Leadville (Colorado) 100-miler.

RACING EXPERIENCE
When Cogburn first competed at Mt. Washington, a year ago, knowledgeable cyclists promptly picked him to win. For several years he had competed professionally, on the Jelly Belly and CCB teams, before relinquishing his professional status to concentrate on his graduate studies at M.I.T., and he was known in cycling circles as a smart, talented competitor. In July 2012 he won Newton’s Revenge, the first bike race up the Auto Road each summer, and then in August he pulled away from a strong field to win the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb, which is held on exactly the same course but with three times as many riders.

Cogburn’s time in the latter race, 52 minutes 28 seconds, was the third-fastest official time ever recorded for the Auto Road ascent. The two faster times belong to Tom Danielson, who was also the first U.S. finisher in the 2011 Tour de France. Although Cogburn’s professional career involved mainly road racing, he has considerable mountain biking experience, and this month he placed fourth in the Leadville 100.

Jeremiah Bishop is a 14-time member of the USA Cycling National Team, which represents the USA at international competitions including Continental and World Championships. He won a gold medal in the 2003 Pan American Games, placed eighth overall at the 2006 World Championships, has been a U.S. national champion in both short-track cross-country and marathon mountain biking and is considered by many observers to be this country’s leading endurance mountain bike racer, having won the 2012 National Ultra Endurance series. A member of the SHO-AIR/Cannondale team, he has been among the top three elite male riders in national cross-country racing this summer, winning the Windham Mountain race in New York state in July and placing third at the Catamount Classic in Vermont on August 4th.

POSSIBLE TOP FEMALE CONTENDERS
Marti Shea, now 50, has concentrated this summer coaching and leading vacation tours in Europe. Without her, the women’s Hillclimb this year may go to Kristen Gohr, 42, of Reading, Massachusetts, who has frequently been runner-up to Shea and finished second in this year’s Newton’s Revenge. Gohr’s time in Newton’s Revenge, one hour 11 minutes 18 seconds, was six minutes slower than Shea’s recent times here, but it is considerably faster than the times of any of the other top women in the Hillclimb field who have raced this course before.

Unless a newcomer to the race can challenge Gohr, the battle for second could be between Stephanie Sydlik, 27, of Cambridge, Mass., and 18-year-old Rachel Chambers of Bolton, Conn. Sydlik placed third this month in Newton’s Revenge, in 1:18:21; Chambers finished sixth in the Hillclimb last year, in 1:20:52.

RACE DETAILS AND BENEFICIARY
The Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb is the primary fundraising event each year for the Tin Mountain Conservation Center in Albany, N.H. The Center offers classes, workshops, excursions and other lessons in the workings of the natural world. Information about educational programs, camps and other activities at Tin Mountain is available at www.tinmountain.org.

The race starts Saturday in five waves, beginning at 8:35 a.m. with the Top Notch (elite) group and continuing at five-minute intervals with four successive waves of riders sorted by age.

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New Electric Charging Station Installed!

PINKHAM NOTCH, NH-It was a notable day for Alternative Energy vehicles at the base of the Mt. Washington Auto Road, as the first ever Electric Vehicle Charging Station was just installed. Less than 24 hours later, the first all electric vehicle, a Tesla S Model, pulled in for a charge. The Auto Road does not “charge for a charge”, though a donation slot is there for those so inclined. Fifteen more Teslas from the New England chapter of the Tesla Car Club arrived for a drive to the summit, which were certainly the quietest cars ever to ascend the Road!

Given the proliferation and widespread acceptance of electric vehicles, Auto Road GM Howie Wemyss decided this was the year to have the Clipper Creek CS 90 charger installed. “Considering that we are hosting the Mt. Washington Auto Road Alt Energy Summit event here on September 14 and 15, there couldn’t be a better time to make this kind of energy available onsite,” Wemyss noted. “We are looking at adding an electric vehicle to our line-up sometime this year and have been evaluating various alternative fuel sources for our stages, as well,” Wemyss added.

Alternative energy is not a new concept for the Auto Road, which currently derives approx. 80% of the energy used for the base building operations from an onsite hydro power source. “Given that we are an environmentally based attraction, we want to do everything we can as individuals and as a company to protect and preserve the natural resources and environment that surrounds us here in Pinkham Notch,” Wemyss said.

An example of what those savings and impact can be was clearly exemplified by the Tesla group’s ascent. “The trip up and down the mountain was as breath-taking as always and everyone enjoyed it. As expected, the trip down was excellent. The cars could not have been built better for descending a mountain. Stable, low to the ground, and aerodynamic, the cars handle wonderfully on the road. Additionally, the regenerative braking means that you don’t have to worry about a straining engine or overheating brakes as the car gracefully glides down at a comfortable and safe speed requiring only occasional touches of the brakes at the hairpin turns,” explained Daniel Einspanjer, a Tesla S model owner and organizer of the group’s gathering.

Perhaps even more impressive than the view and drive down was the energy consumption data: “The 8 mile long and 4,600 feet high ascent consumes somewhere between 12 and 14 kW of energy (about 40 to 45 miles of rated range), while the descent reclaims between 5 and 7 kW of energy (about 20 to 23 miles of rated range) through regenerative braking. This is the future! There are currently more than 13,000 Teslas on the road in the US” Einspanjer noted.

For more information about the new charging station, the Tesla group ascent or the upcoming Mt. Washington Auto Road Alt Energy Summit, call 603-466-3988 or online at www.mtwashingtonautoroad.com

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Mt Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb

· Once-in-a-lifetime raffle highlights race’s fundraising efforts

 · Rides in Italy, Arizona will reward dedication and luck

Pinkham Notch, N.H. – The 41st annual Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb this month will award $1500 apiece to the first male and female cyclists to race to the summit of the highest peak in the northeastern United States. It will also offer any rider the opportunity to win one of four prizes that most cyclists will consider to be worth even more than the Hillclimb winners’ purse.

One of these prizes is lifetime free entry to the Hillclimb. Another is lifetime free entry to the Mt. Washington Century Ride, a 100-mile recreational ride held earlier in the summer on roads encircling Mt. Washington and other peaks in the Presidential Range. The other two are free cycling trips in famously scenic settings far from New Hampshire: southern Arizona and northern Italy.

Held on the third weekend in August, the Hillclimb pits more than 600 riders against the steepest all-uphill paved road they have ever ridden, the 7.6-mile Mt. Washington Auto Road, which climbs 4618 feet to a finish line 6288 feet above sea level. The race also serves as the primary fundraising event for the Tin Mountain Conservation Center in Albany, N.H., a non-profit educational and environmental organization that offers classes, workshops, excursions and other activities for students, schools, and community groups. (See www.tinmountain.org.)

A ONE-TIME OPPORTUNITY
This year, and this year only, Tin Mountain is tempting Hillclimb riders with the chance to enter the race every year automatically, and free, for the rest of their lives. Any Hillclimb entrant who has raised at least $500 in pledges of support for Tin Mountain will be entered in a raffle for which this guarantee of free lifetime entry is the prize. Also entered automatically are the race’s Get In Free riders, those who raise at least $850 and thus have their entry fee waived. Anyone else can enter the raffle by paying $100 for a ticket.

The conservation center is offering a similar opportunity to win lifetime free entry to the Mt. Washington Century, the other Mt. Washington-area cycling event that raises funds for Tin Mountain. All cyclists who raised at least $250 in pledges in connection with their participation in the 2013 Century ride, as well as anyone who pays $75 for a ticket, will be entered in the raffle for lifetime entry to this scenic and demanding 100-mile non-competitive ride.

All entrants in both raffles will be automatically entered in a third drawing, for which the prize is a one-week cycling trip in Arizona. Organized and led by the staff of Destination Cycling, of Marblehead, Mass., the trip includes six night and seven days of cycling and vacation in and around Tucson in February – ideal cycling weather in southern Arizona. Hotel stay, meals and a $300 air travel voucher are part of the package, as is the leadership of veteran cycling coaches.

CLASSICAL CYCLING TOUR
The other special award to Hillclimb entrants is an eight-day, seven-night cycling trip in the Piedmont region of northern Italy, organized and led by Ciclismo Classico of Arlington, Mass. From its base in the city of Torino, the tour covers an average of about 40 miles a day, with breakfast, sumptuous dinners, wine tastings, coaching clinics and four-star hotels.

Unlike the three other cycling prizes that are part of Tin Mountain’s fundraising efforts, the Italian cycling trip is not a raffle prize but a direct award to the Hillclimb entrant who raises the largest sum in pledges from all sources. Last year’s winner was Jonah Thompson, the ebullient junior rider from Albuquerque, N.M., who raised over $4000 in pledges – and who first raced the Hillclimb at the age of nine. Now 14 years old, Thompson will compete in the Hillclimb again this year.

FREE ENTRY FOR JUNIOR CYCLIST
The youngest rider entered in this year’s Hillclimb is 11-year-old Maria Goodwin of Silver Lake, N.H. Goodwin won free entry to the race courtesy of the Residence Inn Marriott of North Conway, the MWV Bicycling Club and the Tin Mountain Conservation Center. These organizations each year review entry applications from students who will be 21 years or younger on race day and select one for free entry. All junior cyclists can apply for the Hillclimb’s Junior Scholarship Program, in which four riders are chosen for reduced entry fees if they raise $175 or more in pledges.

RAFFLE ENTRY
While donations to the Tin Mountain Conservation Center are welcome any time, automatic entry into the raffles closes the day before the event. Since this year’s Century ride took place on July 20, automatic entries to the Century raffle concluded on July 19. Hillclimb entrants can continue raising funds in pledged support through Friday, August 16, in order to reach the $500 or $850 level.

Anyone can still buy tickets to either raffle at any time up to 5 p.m. on December 31, 2013. The raffle will be held, and winners announced on the Tin Mountain web site, on January 1, 2014.

Normally, cyclists wishing to enter the Hillclimb not only must sign up for it promptly in February, when registration opens, but pay an entry fee of $350. The entry fee is this high both because of the logistical complexities of staging a race on the Auto Road and because a large portion of the fee is a charitable donation to Tin Mountain. At the same time, the price hardly deters riders who are eager for the experience of pedaling up a course regarded as more difficult than the steepest climbs in the Tour de France. Each year the race fills to its limit within a few days, sometimes a few minutes, from the time registration opens on line.

To participate in the Mt. Washington Century, riders pay $100 apiece, with special rates for families and for any group of four or more. Entries are accepted until 8 a.m. the morning of the ride.

Free entry for a lifetime to either of these cycling events is a dream for countless cyclists. Race organizers and Tin Mountain staff are encouraging anyone to buy a raffle ticket as a gift for a friend or family member who is also a passionate cyclist. Lifetime entries are not transferable and may not be resold. To buy tickets for either raffle, see instructions at BikeReg.com.

STARTING TIMES
The 2013 Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb will start at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, August 17, when the Top Notch group, or elite first wave of riders, begins the ascent. The rest of the racers depart at five-minute intervals in four consecutive waves, grouped by age. In the case of severe weather on the 17th, the race will be held instead on Sunday, August 18, with the same starting times.

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THE CLIMB TO THE CLOUDS HILLCLIMB RETURNS TO MT. WASHINGTON IN 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
For more information, contact:
Paul Giblin, Event Director
Cell: (603) 986-1217
E-mail: cttc-eventdirector@usa.net

THE CLIMB TO THE CLOUDS HILLCLIMB RETURNS TO MT. WASHINGTON IN 2014
Subaru of America to serve as the event’s Title Sponsor

Pinkham, Notch, NH – Officials with the Sports Car Club of New Hampshire and the Mt. Washington Auto Road located in Pinkham Notch, New Hampshire, announced today that the legendary Mt. Washington Hillclimb will be returning June 26-29, 2014, due in part to the generous help from Subaru of America.

Organized and sanctioned by the Sports Car Club of New Hampshire, the 2014 Subaru Mt. Washington Hillclimb will be a 3-day motorsports festival including a 75-car competition field filled with some of the best drivers from around North America and the world as well as a contingent of rare vintage race cars.

Also known as the “Climb to the Clouds”, the Mt. Washington Hillclimb is one of America’s oldest motorsports events, first run in July, 1904, seven years before the first 500-mile race at the famous Indianapolis Motor Speedway and twelve years prior to the inaugural Pikes Peak Hillclimb in Colorado.  The Climb to the Clouds was run sporadically from 1904-1961, then not again until 1990 when it was run consistently until 2001.  Following a ten-year hiatus, the Mt. Washington Hillclimb returned in 2011 as part of the 150th anniversary celebration of the Mt. Washington Auto Road which first opened on August 8, 1861.

Originally referred to as the Mt. Washington Carriage Road due to the horse-drawn wagons that traversed the road to the summit of Mt. Washington in the late 1800’s, auto manufacturers believed that the Carriage Road would serve as the perfect proving ground for them to demonstrate the ability of their new “horseless carriages.” Promoted as “the greatest contest of motor vehicles ever held”, the inaugural Climb to the Clouds in 1904 included manufacturers such as Rambler, Mercedes, Oldsmobile, Stanley Steamer, Pierce and a high priced Daimler.

In the 1904 Hillclimb F.E. Stanley from Newton, Massachusetts, co-creator of the famous Stanley Steamer, drove his 6-horsepower, 800-pound steam-powered Locomobile to the summit of Mt. Washington only to be beaten by Harry Harkness from New York driving a 40-horsepower Mercedes that weighed 2,200 pounds.  Harkness posted a winning time of 24 minutes, 37 and 3/5 seconds.

Since that first year of competition, many well-known drivers have competed and won the Climb to the Clouds including “Cannonball” Baker in 1928 & 1932 and the legendary Carroll Shelby in 1956. Driving a Franklin in 1928, Baker raced to a time of 14:49.6 seconds. Carroll Shelby, driving a specially prepared Ferrari roadster in 1956, posted a record-setting run of 10:21.8 on his way to victory.

In 1961 Bill Rutan from Connecticut drove his Porsche Carerra-powered Volkswagen to another new record time of 9:13.0 that would stand for the next 29 years – until the return of the race in 1990 when Champion rally driver Tim O’Neil from nearby Franconia, NH drove his 300+ horsepower all-wheel-drive Volkswagen Rally Golf to the summit in an amazing time of just 7 minutes and 45 seconds.

Following the return of the Mt. Washington Hillclimb in 1990, the event was run annually as part of the Mt. Washington Auto Road’s summer event schedule until 2001.  During that time, several new course records were shared between 7-time Sports Car Club of America National Rally Champion Paul Choiniere from Shelburne, VT and multi-time Canadian Rally Champion Frank Sprongl from Mississauga, Ontario. Sprongl went on to set a record time of 6:41.99 in 1998 driving his 500 horsepower Audi Quattro S2 that would stand for 13 years.

In 2011, ten years after the last Mt. Washington Hillclimb was run, Subaru Rally Team USA driver and 4-time Rally America Overall Champion David Higgins, from the Isle of Man, came to Mt. Washington for the very first time.  Driving a Vermont SportsCar-prepared 2011 Subaru WRX STI all-wheel-drive rally car, Higgins set a new overall course record of 6:11.54 – smashing Sprongl’s previous record time by more than 30 seconds!

Following his record-setting run, Higgins stated “It was a very big challenge because the road was still wet in spots and would turn very slick suddenly.  With the clouds the visibility was so low I could hardly see past the hood of my car,” explained Higgins. “Our Subaru was setup perfectly for a road like this but I’ve never raced here before and it was a lot of work to try to learn the course.  It’s fantastic to have the record at such a prestigious event.”

Those racing in the 2014 Subaru Mt. Washington Hillclimb will be competing on the very same 7.6 mile road as the original 1904 event 110 years earlier.  Of course these days the surface has changed with nearly 87% of the road now asphalt and 13% still gravel. The 7.6 mile Auto Road is one of the ultimate challenges for driver and automobile alike.  The serpentine road is lined with trees on the lower half and dramatic drop-offs above halfway as it winds its’ way to the 6, 288 foot summit of the Northeast’s tallest peak – Mt. Washington.

The 2014 Subaru Mt. Washington Hillclimb will take place June 26-29, 2014 and will be organized and sanctioned by the Sports Car Club of New Hampshire – New Hampshire’s premier sports car club.  For more information regarding the Subaru Mt. Washington Hillclimb, the Mt. Washington Auto Road or the Sports Car Club of New Hampshire, visit www.climbtotheclouds.com.

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ABOUT THE MT. WASHINGTON AUTO ROAD:

The Washington Auto Road is considered by many  hillclimb racers to be extremely  technical with a narrow road surface that averages just over 20 feet wide.  In addition to being very narrow with steep drop-offs that vary from side to side, the road is also incredibly steep, with an average 12% grade and gaining slightly more than 4,600 feet in total elevation change from the starting line to the finish line.  The surface of the 7.6 mile Mt. Washington Auto Road is mostly tarmac with approximately one mile of gravel and contains well over 150 turns and switchbacks as the road winds its’ way to the 6, 288 foot summit of the Northeast’s tallest peak.  First opened in 1861 as the Mt. Washington Carriage Road, the Mt. Washington Auto Road is the country’s oldest manmade attraction. Located on Rt. 16 in Pinkham Notch, New Hampshire, just north of the Mt. Washington Valley and minutes south of Gorham, the Auto Road has a long and winding history, much like its 7.6 mile trip up to the summit of the highest peak in the Northeast. For more information, visit www.MtWashingtonAutoRoad.com or call 603-466-3988.

ABOUT THE SPORTS CAR CLUB OF NEW HAMPSHIRE:

Established in 1955 by a group of longtime sports car enthusiasts from across the state of New Hampshire, the Sports Car Club of New Hampshire (SCCNH) is a non-profit 501c3 organization open to any individual who is interested in automobiles or automobile-related activities – whether they are a New Hampshire resident or not.  Driver and motor vehicle safety as well as the improvement of driving skills are the primary focus at all SCCNH events.  Throughout the past 58 years, annual SCCNH event calendars have included a variety of auto crosses, time-speed-distance (TSD) rallies, car shows, hillclimbs, time trials, ice racing and winter cross events.  These days, the Sports Car Club of New Hampshire is comprised of a broad spectrum of members from across New England with a variety of vehicles and varied interests. It’s not uncommon to see everything from a family sedan to an exotic sports car, a pick-up or a specialty car made specifically for hillclimb or road racing entered at any of the Club’s many events.  For more information regarding upcoming Sports Car Club of New Hampshire events or membership, please visit the clubs’ official web site: www.sccnh.org

ABOUT SUBARU OF AMERICA, INC.:

Subaru of America, Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. of Japan. Headquartered in Cherry Hill, N.J., the company markets and distributes Subaru Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive vehicles, parts and accessories through a network of more than 600 dealers across the United States. All Subaru products are manufactured in zero-landfill production plants and Subaru of Indiana Automotive Inc. is the only U.S. automobile production plant to be designated a backyard wildlife habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. For additional information visit www.subaru.com.

“Subaru”, “WRX STI”, all model names, and the Subaru logo are registered trademarks of the Subaru subsidiary of Fuji Heavy Industries, Ltd, Japan. Other trademarks and trade names are those of their respective owners.

 

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Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb

News and updates

·         Cogburn returns to defend title
·         Mountain biker Bishop from Cannondale challenges
·         Women’s race may be Shea, may be a chance for Gohr

Pinkham Notch, N.H. – On July 18 in the Alps, 175 of the world’s greatest cyclists concluded the 18th stage of this year’s Tour de France by riding up the famously steep and switchback-riddled Alpe d’Huez. On Saturday, August 17 in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, 637 cyclists, most of them hardcore amateurs plus a pro rider or two, will race up an even steeper and more daunting road in the annual Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb. From the starting line at the base of the Auto Road, just off Route 16 north of Pinkham Notch, N.H., they’ll pedal 7.6 miles to the summit of the highest peak in the northeastern United States, 6288 feet above sea level.

Racers will start in four waves, beginning with the Top Notch, or elite, group at 8:35 a.m. and continuing with four successive groups, sorted by age and gender, at five-minute intervals. If the weather on August 17 creates unsafe conditions on the mountain’s summit or the higher portions of the Auto Road, the race will be held instead on Sunday, August 18, with the same starting times.

The Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb is the principal fundraising event for the Tin Mountain Conservation Center in Albany, N.H.

THIS YEAR’S TOP RIDERS
Now in its 41st year, the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb attracts Olympians, hardcore bicycle road racers, mountain bikers, triathletes, all-around adventure athletes, tandem teams and even the occasional unicyclist. They are drawn to this grueling event by the Hillclimb’s reputation as the toughest uphill race in America, a reputation enhanced not only by the steepness of the road but also by Mt. Washington’s notorious winds and unpredictable precipitation.

Leading the field in this year’s Hillclimb is 27-year-old Cameron Cogburn, a former professional rider who reverted to amateur status in 2012 in order to concentrate on his graduate studies at M.I.T. Cogburn returns to defend the Hillclimb champion’s title he won last year, when he raced away from the rest of the field to win in 52 minutes 58 seconds, the third-fastest official time ever recorded in this race.

Whether or not Cogburn reaches the top of the Auto Road first may depend on how Jeremiah Bishop handles Mt. Washington. One of the country’s premier mountain bike racers, Bishop, 37, is a former Pan-American Games gold medalist, placed eighth in the 2006 World Mountain Bike championships, and is currently battling for the lead in the national Pro Cross Country Tour of off-road races. A member of the SHO-AIR/Cannondale team, he’ll compete in the 2013 Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb two weeks after the XCT series of races finishes on August 3.

The women’s race is harder to predict. Marti Shea, of Marblehead, Massachusetts, winner of the Hillclimb the past three years, is officially registered, but this week Shea said she has not yet decided whether she’ll compete.

Shea, 50 years old and still dominant on this course, is also a six-time winner of Newton’s Revenge, the other bike race held on the Auto Road each year in July. She missed that race this year because she was leading cycling tours in Europe. Lea Davison of Jericho, Vermont, this year’s winner of Newton’s Revenge, is racing on the XCT circuit and has not indicated that she’ll compete on the Auto Road in August.

Without Shea or Davison, the race could go to Kristen Gohr, 42, of Reading, Massachusetts, who has frequently been runner-up to Shea and finished second to Davison in this year’s Newton’s Revenge. Gohr’s time in the 2013 Newton’s Revenge, one hour 11 minutes 18 seconds, was six minutes slower than Shea’s recent times here, but it is considerably faster than the times of any of the other top women in the field who have raced this course before.

Unless a newcomer to the race can challenge Gohr, the battle for second could be between Stephanie Sydlik, 27, of Cambridge, Mass., and 18-year-old Rachel Chambers of Bolton, Conn. Sydlik placed third this month in Newton’s Revenge, in 1:18:21; Chambers finished sixth in the Hillclimb last year, in 1:20:52.

The other strongest woman in the race is veteran Margaret Thompson, 58, of Clinton, N.Y., who finished just behind Chambers in the Hillclimb last year, in 1:21:02.

The race for third is often close on the men’s side, and it should be this year. Among those likely to be chasing Cogburn and Bishop are Tim Ahearn, 39, of Woodstock, Conn., Chris Yura, 34, of Philadelphia, Pa., Gerry Clapper, 52, of Avon, Conn., and Nico Toutenhoofd, 45, of Boulder, Colo.

Ahearn, who began bike racing only three years ago, placed third in the Hillclimb in 2010 and 2011 as well as third this year in Newton’s Revenge. Yura usually finishes a minute or two behind Ahearn but last year finished ahead of him in the Hillclimb. Clapper’s times are usually close to Yura’s. Toutenhoofd’s performances are harder to predict. In 2010 he won the race outright, beating Ahearn by a minute and Yura by more; last year Ahearn, Yura and Clapper all finished ahead of Toutenhoofd.

Prominent among the younger riders entered is Jonah Thompson of Albuquerque, N.M. Just 14 years old, Thompson is already nationally known as a highly talented and competitive road and off-road bicycle racer. He first raced the Hillclimb in 2008 and has competed on the Auto Road in one or both races here every year since then. In Newton’s Revenge this year he finished 23rd overall in a time of 1:15:25.

The youngest rider entered in this year’s Hillclimb is 11-year-old Marie Goodwin of Silver Lake, N.H. Goodwin won free entry to the race courtesy of the Residence Inn Marriot of North Conway, the MWV Bicycling Club and the Tin Mountain Conservation Center.

TIN MOUNTAIN CONSERVATION CENTER
The entry fee for the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb is $350. Part of that fee covers the considerable logistical expense of staging the race, and part constitutes a donation to the Tin Mountain Conservation Center, which offers classes, workshops, excursions and other lessons in the workings of the natural world.

Tin Mountain maintains and protects properties for conservation, research and recreation for residents and visitors to the area. Its programs are available to students, schools, and community groups. Further information about educational programs, camps and other activities at Tin Mountain is available at www.tinmountain.org.

REGISTRATION AND RECORDS
The Hillclimb continues to be extremely popular among experienced cyclists. On-line registration for this year’s race opened on February 1st and closed ten days later.

The Hillclimb field is limited to 635 cyclists (plus or minus one or two), the maximum the Auto Road can accommodate. This year’s field includes 631 individual cyclists plus three tandem teams. Exceptional late entry is permitted each year to established professional riders.

The men’s course record, 49 minutes 24 seconds, was set in 2002 by Tom Danielson – who became the first American finisher in the 2011 Tour de France. The women’s record belongs to French cycling legend Jeannie Longo, who made the climb in 2000 in 58:14. Formerly, the women’s open record was held by Canadian cyclist Genevieve Jeanson, and former American Tour de France and Olympic rider Tyler Hamilton had recorded four finishing times faster than Cameron Cogburn’s; these two riders’ times were deleted from the official records following their admissions of having used performance-enhancing drugs during their competitive careers.

Registration for the Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb is managed by BikeReg.com. For a complete list of riders entered, go to https://www.bikereg.com/net/Confirmed/17625

B.U.M.P.S. COMPETITION
The Mt. Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb is one of the 11 events in the Bike Up the Mountain Point Series (B.U.M.P.S.) The series includes Mt. Ascutney in Vermont, Mt. Greylock in Massachusetts, Mt. Kearsarge in New Hampshire, Whiteface Mountain in New York State, and other uphill races. For further information see www.hillclimbseries.com.

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